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Note: The next two reviews of recent books by Andrew Breitbart and Patrick Buchanan are not intended as a salvo in the internecine struggle that is the American politico-cultural scene. I’ll try to keep things brief for Readers who Hope for a Change of subject… (Never fear, a review of a delightful book on Fabergé eggs is coming soon!)

TitleRighteous Indignation: Excuse Me While I Save the World!, by Andrew Breitbart

Motivation: The author’s untimely death provoked this reviewer’s curiosity

Completed: March 28, 2012 (#24)

Recommendation: A memoir of a short life lived like a conservative Curb Your Enthusiasm episode

Sapere aude! Having been absent from the United States for much of Mr. Breitbart’s short career as a conservative “new media” impresario, the proprietor of A Superfluous Man was perhaps more unfamiliar than most with l’affaire Weiner or the infiltration of ACORN by agents provocateurs posing as pimps and whores [sic].

No longer! Righteous Indignation provides an exhaustive thrust and parry account of Mr. Breitbart’s quixotic quest to bring down what he terms “The Complex”:

The biggest key to the success of the ACORN story was the structure we had created. I am a single organism who can act swiftly and make decisions on the fly. The Complex is a leviathan, an entity that moves slowly, that has natural momentum and can’t stop on a dime. The Democratic Party, Barack Obama, the Progressive movement, John Podesta, and George Soros—all these entities have to coordinate their counterstrategy, create a game plan. I don’t have that problem. I can stick and move. And I know them down to their core. I understand their Alinsky mind-set, their Clinton mind-set, their Podesta mind-set, their Media Matters mind-set. They are entirely predictable. People who grant me expertise in media tactics don’t seem to recognize how ordinary the Complex’s reactions were. Every step of the way I predicted how they were going to behave, and every step of the way they came through.

This site is designed to chronicle the books this reviewer reads in 2012, not to proselytize. Thus, please apply to yourself the following litmus test: If you are the type who will respond favorably to a few hundred pages of such passages, by all means, purchase Mr. Breitbart’s book.

If not, please come back another day when we can emerge hand-in-hand from the Cave of Shadows to discuss more elevated subjects than the most politically effective way to release photographs of a Congressman’s pudendum masculinum via the Internet (however entertaining Mr. Breitbart’s description of that particular episode may be).

For an entrée into the happy warrior’s style, please consider the below speech from the 2012 CPAC convention, one of Mr. Breitbart’s last public appearances before his untimely demise: